Archive for Lark Books

500 Cabinets

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , , on July 5, 2011 by johnwiggers

Last year three of my furniture pieces were published in a book entitled: “500 Cabinets: A Showcase of Design & Craftsmanship”.

It was an incredible honour to be showcased alongside so many of the world’s finest furniture designers and makers.

Juried by John Grew Sheridan, “500 cabinets” showcases the art and craft of fine furniture making with examples of contemporary works from 300 different makers.

The Andiroba Cabinet was one of the pieces selected. In the photos below you can see this design sculpted out of Mottled Tangare, and fitted as a standing humidor.

For those wishing to respect the Cuban embargo, please close your eyes to the Cohibas.

Also featured was the Gentleman’s Valet, which was crafted out of a rare sampling of Curly Birds Eye Maple, and inlaid with Makore and Ebony.

Using a technique similar to the Andiroba, the outer case is made as 2 seamless half shells that hinge/pivot open to reveal the interior.

The inside of the valet contains 7 drawers plus a pair of doors for storage at the bottom.

The upper drawer has individual compartments to receive wrist watches and cuff links.

Slots for fountain pens are located in the center tray.

The third cabinet accepted for publication was a piece called Digitaria/Blue Star.

This multi-angular design was inspired by the Wally 118 superyacht, with its geometry being highlighted by the subtle contrast between the polished stainless steel base and the satin black lacquer cabinetry.

In the isometric view the 3-dimensionality of the design is more apparent.

The interior of Digitaria/Blue star is crafted from natural maple plywood. The 4 drawers are dovetailed solid maple, and pop open using Blumotion slides and Blum’s pneumatic touch latch system.

This detail view of the upper corner shows how the angles of the multiple surfaces intersect.

The top is bevel back painted glass, set into a recess.

500 Tables, by Lark Books

Posted in Uncategorized with tags , , , , , , , on June 21, 2011 by johnwiggers

In “500 Tables” by Lark Books esteemed juror Andrew Glasgow selected a wide array of table styles and forms, from pieces that showcase masterful artwork to ones that feature alternative materials and aesthetic sensibilities. Published in 2009 this book features more than 300 artists.

We had the good fortune of having three tables selected for this publication.

This Cuff Link Table measures 12″ dia and 18-1/2″ high and is made of a wood called Madero Acero. The wood on the top was cut into a sunburst pattern, with the grain allowed to cascade as a waterfall down the tapered cone sides. A polished stainless steel collar separates the split cone segments.

“Solomon’s Desk” measures 50-7/8″ long by 18-7/8″ wide by 29″ high. It was crafted from a rare sampling of Narra timber that came from of the very first batch of wood to be sustainably harvested on the Solomon Islands in the early to mid-1990s. This Narra made its way into North American by way of Eco-Timber in California.

A pencil drawer with bevelled edge was discretely inset into the edge of the top.

Inside the drawer is a lidded tray made of Hawthorn and Sassafras woods. Both of these woods were used in traditional medicine for their aromatherapeutic and Ayurvedic properties. These scents accumulate naturally inside the drawer while it is closed, before being released when it is opened.

The drawer box is literally a puzzle that is fitted together by means of sliding dovetail construction. The back mitres are joined by a solid walnut dovetailed key, while the Narra bottom is set into dadoes on all 4 sides.

The finger pull inlay on the underside of the top is crafted from a special sampling of Black Walnut (Juglans nigra). It is relevant that this is located in a place that is frequently touched because Native American medicine women discovered through many generations of trial, error and observation that this wood has medicinal properties said to be conducive to healing. It was believed that simply touching this wood would release the active molecules to the surface of one’s skin, where they could be naturally absorbed into the pores.

Although such claims were initially dismissed as little more than old wives’ tales, these active molecules (known scientifically as ellagitannins) are currently at the leading edge of research into finding a cure for cancer.

The Whale Tail Desk was crafted from a reclaimed flitch of Macassar Ebony veneer, with the high gloss finish helping create the illusion of a Right Whale breeching in preparation for a deep dive.

An anthracite grommet in the top allows wiring to access the floor by means of a vertebrae wire management system hidden inside the lower torso of the desk. Stability is achieved by securing the desk to the floor by means of hidden fasteners.